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PATTAYA, THAILAND

From single men to entire families, tourists stroll down Walking Street, Pattaya’s main attraction. A morbid street where sex is sold widely and freely, and nothing seems to be taboo. At the street’s entry, a Tourist Police patrol stands; “This is Pattaya’s main tourist attraction”, an Englishman who volunteers for the Tourist Police says, “and no one is forced to be here”. Nonetheless, the sex industry in Pattaya is a multi-million dollar business, and is responsible for numerous cases of human trafficking.
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 CAMBODIA

Since August 2011, more than 200 people have died in Cambodia due to flooding, most of the victims have been children. Around the country, villagers have had their homes destroyed by the floods, or had to abandon them to find higher grounds or buildings on stilts to take refuge. Schools and pagodas have become evacuation centers for hundreds of families, and livestock has been moved to any dry patch of land in many cases cluttering busy roads. Villagers complain that in the last three months not enough aid has been provided, leaving them vulnerable to hunger and disease.

Out of Cambodia’s 23 provinces, 17 have been affected along the Mekong river and Tonle Sap. The Cambodian government has estimated that about 190-thousand hectares of rice fields have been destroyed, and according to the National Committee for Disaster Management 1.2 million people are affected by the flooding, still the government has yet to declare the flooding a national emergency. In the meanwhile, international humanitarian organizations struggle to raise enough funds to deal with the extent of the problem, having to limit their aid to help the very poorest.
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PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA

Having had their homes destroyed by excavators, early in the morning residents come back to put up tarps where their homes stood the day before. While collectors looked through the rubble for materials they can resell, residents help each other writing on the tarps questions like “Where’s my house, where is my right?” and SOS signs as symbol of resistance. They expected the machines to come back and continue the evictions.

As the sun went down, Boeung Kak residents burnt tires as a sign of defiance.
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PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA

More than eight families were left homeless after two excavators showed up at village 22 to demolish their homes. The residents claim no previous notice was given, nor any compensation was offered for their homes. With their belongings on the street, a trail of debris and a man left unconscious, residents are determined to fight back and claim their basic rights.
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